The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

The Phantom of the Opera (1925 film).jpgOn September 23, 1909 Gaston Leroux’s famous novel The Phantom the Opera was published in France. Throughout the years, this novel would grow on to become one of the most famous of all time. The haunting of The Paris Opera House captured the imagination. In 1925 The Phantom of the Opera was brought to life in the famous silent film.

Christine Daae is given the chance to star in the opera show after the lead Carlotta is taken ill. Unbeknownst to Christine, the mysterious man who has been giving her lessons orchestrated this. With the legend of the Phantom floating around, Christine follows him into his lair one night. After spending the night, she wakes up and unmasks him leading to the viewing of his hideous face. Upon seeing this she faints, yet manages to head up to the opera house by promising the phantom she is his. However, she doesn’t love him, she loves Raoul. After seeing Raoul propose to Christine and her accept, Erik, the Phantom vows revenge. He makes his grand appearance at the ball frightening Christine causing their to be plans for a trap to be made for him. However, this fails with Christine being held hostage by the mad man. Raoul and a policeman make their way below as an angry mob forms. Christine and Raoul escape with Erik being killed by the angry mob.

The Phantom of the Opera is one of the most iconic movies and books of all times. On September 23, 1909 , Gaston Leroux novel appeared in France. Without it, there would not be the mad man  Erik with the Paris Opera House capturing the imagination.

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